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Dr Gail Ewing

Senior Research Associate


Office Phone: (+44) 01223 334881

Biography:

My background is in Social Sciences and Nursing. I completed an integrated course in the Department of Nursing Studies at the University of Edinburgh which combined a degree programme with general and district nurse training. I went on to qualify as a midwife and later as a health visitor. I was awarded a Scottish Home and Health Department Nursing Research Training Fellowship enabling me to complete my PhD at the Nursing Research Unit, University of Edinburgh with a study that examined the educational preparation of patients for self care after stoma surgery.

Initially I worked in maternal/child health and infant feeding, in both research and practice, but in the last fifteen years I have worked in palliative care research, initially at the Institute of Public Health, then based at the Centre for Family Research since 2004.

Research Interests

I have been involved in palliative care research with patients, carers and health care professionals in primary, secondary and hospice home care. My current work is focused on two areas: the support needs of family carers and sharing bad news: how patients share news of a cancer diagnosis with family and friends.

I have worked in collaboration with Professor Gunn Grande at The University of Manchester on a series of studies of carer support. We have developed the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT): comprising 14 broad domains identified by family carers and as key areas of support in palliative and end of life care. The tool has been validated with current carers in palliative and end of life care and pilot and feasibility studies of implementation of the CSNAT in hospice home care practice have been completed. A trial is currently underway to evaluate the use of the CSNAT as a practice intervention within six hospice home care services in England and a further large scale implementation project involving the CSNAT is just starting.

I also work with Dr Nothando Ngwenya on the Sharing Bad News study. It is a multidisciplinary study involving colleagues at the Primary Care Unit, University of Cambridge, University of Nottingham and Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. The study is examining the experience of sharing news of a cancer diagnosis from the perspectives of patients, those accompanying them at diagnosis giving consultations and health care professionals involved in breaking bad news in order to develop an intervention to support/prepare patient with this difficult process.

Key Publications

Ewing G, Brundle C, Payne S, Grande G. The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) for Use in Palliative and End-of-life Care at Home: A Validation Study. J Pain Symptom Manage 2013: 46: 395-405.

Ewing G, Grande GE. Development of a Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) for end of life care practice at home: a qualitative study. Palliat Med 2013; 27: 244-256.

GriffithsJ, Ewing G, Rogers M. Early support visits by district nurses to cancer patients at home: A multi-perspective qualitative study. Palliat Med 2013; 27: 349-357.

Preston NJ, Farquhar MC, Walshe CE, Stevinson C, Ewing G, Calman LA, Burden S, Brown Wilson C, Hopkinson JB, Todd C. Strategies to increase participant recruitment to research studies by healthcare professionals. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 9. Art. No.: MR000036. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.MR000036.

Walshe C, Ewing G, Griffiths J. Using observation as a data collection method to help understand patient and professional roles and actions in palliative care settings. Palliat Med 2012; 26(8):1048-1054.

Yang GM, Ewing G, Booth S. What is the role of specialist palliative care in an acute hospital setting? A qualitative study exploring views of patients and carers. Palliat Med 2012; 26:1011-17.

Farquhar MC, Ewing G, and Booth C. Using mixed methods to develop and evaluate complex interventions in palliative care research. Palliat Med 2011; 25(8) 748–757.

Griffiths J, Ewing G and Rogers M “Moving swiftly on”: psychological support provided by District Nurses to patients with palliative care needs. Cancer Nurs 2010. 33(5): 390-397

Farquhar M, Ewing G, Higginson IJ, Booth S. The experience of using the SEIQoL-DW with patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): issues of process and outcome. Qual Life Res 2010; 19: 619-629.

Hudson P, Trauer T, Robson S, Grande G, Ewing G, Payne S, Stajduhar K, Thomas, K. A systematic review of instruments related to family caregivers of palliative care patients. Palliative Medicine 2010; 24(7): 656–668.

Payne S, Hudson P, Grande G, Oliviere D, Tishelman C, Pleschberger S, Firth P, Ewing G, Hawker S, Kerr C. White Paper on Improving Support for Family Carers in Palliative Care: Recommendations from the European Association for Palliative Care Task Force on Family Carers. Part 1 European Journal of Palliative Care 2010; 17(5): 238-245.

Payne S, Hudson P, Grande G, Oliviere D, Tishelman C, Pleschberger S, Firth P, Ewing G, Hawker S, Kerr C. White Paper on Improving Support for Family Carers in Palliative Care: Recommendations from the European Association for Palliative Care Task Force on Family Carers. Part 2 European Journal of Palliative Care 2010; 17(6): 286-290.

Ewing G, Farquhar M, Booth S. Delivering palliative care in an acute hospital setting; views of referrers and specialist providers. J Pain Symptom Manage 2009; 38 (3): 327-340.

Grande G, Ewing G. Informal carer bereavement outcome: relation to quality of end of life support and achievement of preferred place of death. Palliat Med 2009; 23: 248-256.

Grande G, Ewing G. Death at home unlikely if informal carers prefer otherwise: implications for policy. Palliat Med 2008; 22: 971-972.

Griffiths J., Ewing G, Rogers M, Barclay S, McCabe J, Martin A, Todd C. (2007) Supporting cancer patients with palliative care needs: district nurses' role perceptions. Cancer Nurs 30(2):156-62.

Ewing G, Rogers M, Barclay S, McCabe J, Martin A, Campbell M, Todd C. Palliative Care in Primary Care: a study to determine whether patients and professionals agree on symptoms. Br J Gen Pract 2006:56:27-34.

Ewing G, Rogers M, Barclay S, McCabe J, Martin A, Todd C. Recruiting patients into a primary care based study of palliative care: why is it so difficult? Palliat Med 2004;18:452-459.

Ewing G, Todd C, Rogers M, Barclay S, McCabe J, Martin A. Validation of a symptom measure suitable for use among palliative care patients in the community: CAMPAS-R. J Pain Symptom Manage 2004;27:287-99.